Verizon's Quantum TV DVR Records up to 12 Channels at Once

Verizon's Quantum TV DVR Records up to 12 Channels at Once

Verizon’s latest DVR is less set-top box and more home media server: with six tuners and a 1TB hard drive, you can add a second DVR unit to record up to 12 channels at once and feed 10 TVs at any given time.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/z-RBlLHdr0o/verizons-quantum-tv-dvr-records-up-to-12-channels-at-o-1555932485
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Driverless cars as life savers, pigeons as pedestrians, lip readers as crime stoppers, and alcoholic

Driverless cars as life savers, pigeons as pedestrians, lip readers as crime stoppers, and alcoholics as city employees. These are just a few of the urban reads on our radar this week.

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Tags: apple store   Tara Lynn   Emily Ratajkowski   miguel cotto   snl  

More Than a Record Shop: Inside Brooklyn’s Massive New Music Outpost

More Than a Record Shop: Inside Brooklyn's Massive New Music Outpost

Holy crap, someone is opening a new record store? Who in their right mind would open a record store? And in New York of all places, with its exorbitant rents! Didn’t these guys see what happened those who came before them? Well, this is different.

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ESPN renames ScoreCenter app to SportsCenter, adds a wealth of personalization

Say goodbye to ESPN’s ScoreCenter app. Don’t worry though, the sports broadcast network has renamed the popular mobile software SportsCenter alongside a redesign. The refresh brings video highlights, social functionality and personalized content to those looking to remain up to speed or follow along on-the-go. For example, you’ll now be able to set favorite teams to quickly display content and get info on those clubs to the app’s inbox. Clubhouses “for every team and league under the sun” serve up all of the latest franchise news in one convenient spot. Tweets from on-air commentators and shows are included with ESPN Now alongside access to WatchESPN content for easy streaming of live or archived events and much more. The latest version is now available for both iOS and Android devices via their respective app libraries.

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Embark on a pirate adventure in Nightmares from the Deep: The Cursed Heart

Hidden object games are a great fit for mobile devices because users can scan around a complex image and directly tap the objects they find. But some gamers want more than just objects to find – they seek a little narrative, a slice of adventure. That’s where the Hidden Object Puzzle Adventure (HOPA) genre comes in.

Of the many HOPA developers working on PC and mobile, Poland-based Artifex Mundi is easily one of the best. Their games feature intriguing premises and beautifully painted scenes. Today we look at Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart, one of Artifex Mundi’s most popular titles.

Pirate’s Love

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

Cursed Heart is the first game in the Nightmares from the Deep series. Its story centers around a supernatural pirate named Remington whose decayed body comes to life inside of a museum. Soon he wrecks the museum and kidnaps the museum director’s daughter. As the director Sarah Hall, you must to follow Remington to his island base and rescue her before it’s too late.

The story comes to life via fully voiced and competently acted dialogue. The cinematic sequences appear in two forms: CG animation and hand-drawn animation. The CG rendered movies look great and match the in-game background artwork in terms of beauty. The hand-drawn sequences are passable, but their character art and grasp of anatomy often leaves something to be desired.

A dozen doubloons

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

Besides rescuing your daughter, the main goal in Cursed Heart is to find 12 special doubloons hidden throughout the game. When gathered together, the doubloons will open a magical quest and reveal its mysterious contents.

Each doubloon placed on the chest also causes a movie to play that will reveal a little more of the game’s backstory. The only problem with these scenes and the game’s story in general is that it’s too front-loaded. You’ll learn how the captain got his power, the importance of a woman from his past, and his plans for the kidnapped daughter way too early in the game. Each doubloon’s story scene fleshes things out a bit more, but you’ll have the whole story figured out long before collecting the last one.

Puzzles

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

As an adventure game, Cursed Heart has more than its fair share of puzzles. Often these involve scanning the environment for objects to gather and use later. Things you pick up appear in your inventory, which is always accessible from the bottom of the screen. To use an item on something in the environment, simply tap and drag it to the desired location.

The game classifies more complex puzzles as minigame puzzles. These come in the standard varieties like assembling a painting from pieces, rotating starfish to make a pattern, mixing a chemical formula, and more.

A few puzzles get too esoteric and finicky for my liking, such as a minigame involving reassembling a broken record. I put all the pieces together seemingly perfectly, but the game didn’t lock them in place and register the record as reassembled.

Luckily, you can skip the occasional problematic puzzle on the default difficulty. You can also use hints to direct you to the next location or important items in the background. Both functions operate on timers, so you can’t just use them nonstop.

Another helpful function is the map system. After leaving the museum, you’ll have access to maps of each subsequent environment. Besides the obvious aid in navigation, maps also indicate locations of the next puzzle or action you’re supposed to do. Maps are still present on the hardcore difficulty option, but the rest of the hints will be disabled.

Hidden objects

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

Without hidden object sequences, a HOPA would just be an adventure game. Cursed Heart does have a number of hidden object scenes, though they’re spread out a bit between the other types of puzzles. Each scene includes a list of nine or so items to find. Sometimes you’ll have to combine, open, or move things in order to find the right items.

The hidden object scenes, like the background art in general are gorgeously drawn and filled with luscious details. In some games, these scenes are just cluttered with randomly-placed junk and seem to be designed more for challenge than anything else. Cursed Heart’s hidden object sequences show more artistry and less impossible object density, making for much more plausible scenes.

Matching tiles

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

Players who don’t care for hidden object games will be pleased to know that Cursed Heart provides an alternative to those sequences. Whenever one comes up, you can choose to play mahjong solitaire (also known as Shanghai) instead! You know, that’s the game in which players must match pairs of tiles that are stacked in a pattern. The tiles have pirate themed artwork and everything.

The mahjong solitaire puzzles are focused more on fun than challenge. Players can choose to reshuffle the stack at any time, and it will automatically reshuffle whenever no moves are left. The puzzles do increase in complexity as the game progresses, though.

Players can mix and match between hidden objects and mahjong for variety, though you’d miss out on a a Game Center Achievement or two by doing so. Completing either type of puzzle will reward you with an inventory item that will be needed in order to progress.

Collector’s Edition features

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

The iOS versions of Cursed Heart bear the “Collector’s Edition” subtitle. So does pretty much every other version of the game, so it seems like the default edition to me. But the game does include some unlockable bonus features that warrant the fancy subtitle.

  • Minigames: Replay any of 16 minigames from the main adventure.
  • Hidden object scenes: Choose from the 19 hidden object puzzles found in the main adventure.
  • Videos: Nine regular story videos and 12 doubloon videos to watch
  • Concept art: Nine paintings representing scenes from the game

You can’t choose to replay the mahjong solitaire puzzles directly, but they can be revisited from within the individual hidden object puzzles. Other than a dedicated mahjong menu, the only bonus feature the game really lacks is a sound test.

Epilogue

Cursed Heart’s Extras menu holds one more special feature: a Bonus Adventure. This mini adventure functions as an epilogue and lasts an hour or two.

The museum director has survived the main adventure but she must fill find a way to get back home. The Bonus Adventure contains the same exploration, puzzles, and hidden object gameplay you’d find in the main game. It even has voice acted dialogue.

While it’s classified as a Bonus Adventure, the epilogue could have just as easily been included within the main game. I suppose having it as a separate option is handy for when you want a short play session on the go.

Not a nightmare to play

Nightmares from the Deep: the Cursed Heart

If you enjoy adventure games, finding hidden objects, or even matching mahjong tiles, Nightmares from the Deep: The Cursed Heart is a must-play. The sequel Nightmares from the Deep: the Siren’s Call recently launched on Windows Phone, so we can expect an iOS port shortly.

Cursed Heart is available in a free version that is essentially a trial. You can unlock the full game with an In-App Purchase. It also comes in both regular ($4.99) and HD ($6.99) flavors, so be sure to get the one that best fits your display.

    



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/CSwaS_oznRo/story01.htm
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Are Obama’s ratings dipping past the point of no return?

Washington (AFP) – Barack Obama’s second term fumbles have pitched him to record low poll ratings and splintered his credibility with the American people.

But has his presidency reached the point of no return?

History and opinion poll data suggest that when reelected presidents slump in the ratings, it is tough, if not impossible to bounce back.

Obama, stung by the amateurish debut of his health care plan, which has sent fellow Democrats into revolt, is beginning to sense the depth of his woes.

“I do make apologies for not having executed better over the last several months,” he said at a Thursday press conference, punctuated by uncharacteristic mea culpas.

“Am I going to have to do some work to rebuild confidence around some of our initiatives? Yes.”

He had better act fast.

An NBC/Wall Street Journal survey two weeks ago had the president’s approval rating down to 42 percent. A week later, Pew Research put Obama at 41 percent. By Wednesday, Quinnipiac University had him at 39 percent, a new low.

The data suggest Obama can no longer count on the solid floor of support that has sustained his crisis-strewn presidency.

“For the first time it appears that 40 percent floor is cracking,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.

But do polls matter for a man who will never again be on the ballot?

Second term presidents enjoy some freedom from the tyranny of their job ratings — and become more obsessed with staving off dreaded lame duck status.

But Obama’s deteriorating image threatens to shred his remaining authority on Capitol Hill — where key priorities, including immigration reform are on life support.

He is also pleading with sanctions-wielding senators for more time to do a nuclear deal with Iran.

And Obama’s unpopularity is spooking Democrats with tough races in next year’s mid-term elections, which may doom his long-shot hopes of seeing his party recapture the House of Representatives.

Already, Obama is getting the cold shoulder from vulnerable Democrats, including Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu who is brandishing her own bill to clean up the Obamacare mess.

Charlie Cook, a renowned political analyst, suggests Obama’s presidency is suffering a “classic case of second term fatigue.”

Bill Clinton saw his second term consumed by a sex scandal, George W. Bush was brought low by Iraq and Ronald Reagan struggled through the Iran-Contra scandal.

Obama’s self-inflicted wound is the jammed Affordable Care Act website and his discredited promise that if Americans liked the health insurance they already had, they could keep it.

The damage is obvious: Quinnipiac found that by 52-44 percent, people thought their president was not honest.

“Any elected official with an eight point deficit is in serious trouble,” Malloy said.

Obama’s spokesman Jay Carney offered the timeworn politician’s trope that his boss did not “spend a lot of time, worrying about ups and downs in polls.”

But no president in the last 60 years who has got into deep polling trouble in their second term has been able to bounce back

Only Dwight Eisenhower and Clinton bettered their approval ratings after one year of their second term before leaving town — and they were popular to start with.

Worryingly for Obama, the president whose polling track he most resembles at this point is George W. Bush, who slunk out of Washington with a pitiful 34 percent approval.

Still, Obama is lucky in his enemies: Republicans are down at 30 percent approval after a government shutdown and debt ceiling debacle last month.

Obama has also defied political logic before — historical portents had suggested that saddled with a sluggish economy and approval ratings of under 50 percent for much of his first term he would not get a second.

After better than expected jobs data last week, some believe if fixes to Obamacare that the president unveiled on Thursday work — a big if — he could be spared long term political damage.

“The question now, is whether he will continue to go down, as Bush did,” said Carroll Doherty, an associate director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press.

“A lot depends on what happens with the health care law and a lot depends on the economy.”

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/obamas-ratings-dipping-past-point-no-return-110829267.html
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Studies explore potential origins of addiction and treatments

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Society for Neuroscience

Novel therapies for nicotine, heroin, and gambling addiction show promise

SAN DIEGO Studies released today suggest promising new treatments for nicotine and heroin addiction, and further our understanding of pathological gambling and heroin abuse in those suffering chronic pain. This new knowledge, released at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health, may one day lead to non-pharmaceutical interventions and therapies to treat addiction.

According to the World Health Organization, 15.3 million people worldwide suffer from drug use disorders. A variety of brain areas and processes play a role in addictive behaviors, complicating treatment and costing millions of dollars and lives each year. Today’s studies contribute to an understanding of how compulsive disorders like addiction develop and provide new insight into methods to treat addictive behaviors .

The new findings show that:

  • Magnetic stimulation of the brain helps some people decrease their smoking, and even quit altogether for up to six months after treatment (Abraham Zangen, abstract 635.03, see attached summary).
  • Stimulating an area of the brain associated with drug reward, the subthalamic nucleus, reduces rats’ motivation to take heroin (Carrie Wade, PhD, abstract 818.03, see attached summary).
  • Chronic pain leads rats already exposed to drugs to take more and higher doses of heroin, suggesting that people with addiction are more susceptible to overdose when in chronic pain (Lucia Hipolito, PhD, abstract 158.05, see attached summary).

Other recent findings discussed show that:

  • Drug abuse stresses the brain, and the resulting dysregulation of systems involved in the stress response could contribute to negative feelings that trigger increased drug taking and addiction (George Koob, PhD, presentation 689, see attached speaker summary).
  • Research suggests an area of the brain known as the insula may be overactive in people with gambling problems. People with damage to this area were less prone to the motivations of gamblers, providing a clue to identify areas of the brain that are linked to gambling addiction (Luke Clark, PhD, presentation 686.05, see attached speaker summary).
  • Pathological gamblers may love a cash payout, but care less about other types of rewards, such as sex or food. Researchers found pathological gamblers showed decreased activity in reward-sensitive brain areas when money wasn’t involved (Guillaume Sescousse, PhD, presentation 686.06, see attached speaker summary).

“Non-drug interventions would be an enormous step forward in drug abuse treatment, which currently relies on replacing one drug with another and has an extremely high rate of relapse,” said press conference moderator Barry Everitt of the University of Cambridge, an expert in drug abuse research. “Today’s exciting results give us new ways of understanding why compulsive conditions such as drug abuse and pathological gambling might arise, and give us targets to explore for non-drug treatment, which would help us treat a population suffering from addiction.”

###

This research was supported by national funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, as well as private and philanthropic organizations. Find more information on addiction at BrainFacts.org.

http://www.sfn.org/~/media/SfN/Documents/Press%20Releases/2013/Neuroscience%202013/Addiction.ashx


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[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

12-Nov-2013

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Share Share

Contact: Kat Snodgrass
media@sfn.org
202-962-4090
Society for Neuroscience

Novel therapies for nicotine, heroin, and gambling addiction show promise

SAN DIEGO Studies released today suggest promising new treatments for nicotine and heroin addiction, and further our understanding of pathological gambling and heroin abuse in those suffering chronic pain. This new knowledge, released at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health, may one day lead to non-pharmaceutical interventions and therapies to treat addiction.

According to the World Health Organization, 15.3 million people worldwide suffer from drug use disorders. A variety of brain areas and processes play a role in addictive behaviors, complicating treatment and costing millions of dollars and lives each year. Today’s studies contribute to an understanding of how compulsive disorders like addiction develop and provide new insight into methods to treat addictive behaviors .

The new findings show that:

  • Magnetic stimulation of the brain helps some people decrease their smoking, and even quit altogether for up to six months after treatment (Abraham Zangen, abstract 635.03, see attached summary).
  • Stimulating an area of the brain associated with drug reward, the subthalamic nucleus, reduces rats’ motivation to take heroin (Carrie Wade, PhD, abstract 818.03, see attached summary).
  • Chronic pain leads rats already exposed to drugs to take more and higher doses of heroin, suggesting that people with addiction are more susceptible to overdose when in chronic pain (Lucia Hipolito, PhD, abstract 158.05, see attached summary).

Other recent findings discussed show that:

  • Drug abuse stresses the brain, and the resulting dysregulation of systems involved in the stress response could contribute to negative feelings that trigger increased drug taking and addiction (George Koob, PhD, presentation 689, see attached speaker summary).
  • Research suggests an area of the brain known as the insula may be overactive in people with gambling problems. People with damage to this area were less prone to the motivations of gamblers, providing a clue to identify areas of the brain that are linked to gambling addiction (Luke Clark, PhD, presentation 686.05, see attached speaker summary).
  • Pathological gamblers may love a cash payout, but care less about other types of rewards, such as sex or food. Researchers found pathological gamblers showed decreased activity in reward-sensitive brain areas when money wasn’t involved (Guillaume Sescousse, PhD, presentation 686.06, see attached speaker summary).

“Non-drug interventions would be an enormous step forward in drug abuse treatment, which currently relies on replacing one drug with another and has an extremely high rate of relapse,” said press conference moderator Barry Everitt of the University of Cambridge, an expert in drug abuse research. “Today’s exciting results give us new ways of understanding why compulsive conditions such as drug abuse and pathological gambling might arise, and give us targets to explore for non-drug treatment, which would help us treat a population suffering from addiction.”

###

This research was supported by national funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, as well as private and philanthropic organizations. Find more information on addiction at BrainFacts.org.

http://www.sfn.org/~/media/SfN/Documents/Press%20Releases/2013/Neuroscience%202013/Addiction.ashx


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/sfn-sep111213.php
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Final toast to WWII Doolittle Raiders: ‘Peace’

AAA  Nov. 10, 2013 4:13 AM ET
Final toast to WWII Doolittle Raiders: ‘Peace’
By DAN SEWELLBy DAN SEWELL, Associated Press THE ASSOCIATED PRESS STATEMENT OF NEWS VALUES AND PRINCIPLES 

Richard Cole, center, proposes a toast with two other surviving members of the 1942 Tokyo raid led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, Edward Saylor, left, and David Thatcher, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, at the National Museum for the US Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. The fourth surviving member, Robert Hite, was unable to travel to the ceremonies. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Richard Cole, center, proposes a toast with two other surviving members of the 1942 Tokyo raid led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, Edward Saylor, left, and David Thatcher, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, at the National Museum for the US Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. The fourth surviving member, Robert Hite, was unable to travel to the ceremonies. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Three of the four surviving members of the 1942 Tokyo raid led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, left to right, David Thatcher, Edward Saylor, and Richard Cole, pose next to a monument marking the raid, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, outside the National Museum for the US Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. The fourth surviving member, Robert Hite, was unable to travel to the ceremonies. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

David Thatcher, one of the four surviving members of the 1942 raid on Tokyo led by Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle, waves from a car as he arrives at the National Museum of the US Air Force, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, in Dayton, Ohio. Three of the four surviving members of the WWII raid came for a final toast in the evening. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

FILE – In this July 14, 1943 file photo, Maj. Gen. James Doolittle, (third from left, front row) who led the air raid on Japan, April 18, 1942, and some of the men who flew with him drink a champagne toast from coffee cups during a reunion in North Africa on the first anniversary of the flight. Flyers are left to right front row: Maj. William Bower, Ravenna, OH; Maj. Travis Hoover, Arlington, Calif.; Maj. Gen. Doolittle Lt. Col. Harvey Hinman, San Francisco, (not one of raiders); Capt. Neston C. Daniel, Plaquemine, LA., Back row left to right: Capt. Howard A. Sessler of Arlington, Mass., who brought the picture to this country; Capt. William R. Pound, Jr., Kent Homes VA.; Maj. Rodney R. Wilder, Taylor, Tex.; Capt. James M. Arker, Livingston, Tex., Maj. Charles R. Greening, Tacoma, Wash., Maj. Joseph Klein, Paradise, Tex.; Capt. Griffith P. William, San. Diego, Calif., and Capt. Thomas C. Griffin, Chicago, Ill. (AP Photo)

FILE – In this Sept. 4, 1945 file photo, three of the fliers who raided Tokyo with Gen. James Doolittle in April,1942, are photographed in Washington, D.C. From left, Sgt. J.D. De Shazer, Salem, Ore, 1st Lt. Robert Hite, Earth, Tex., and 1st LT. C.J. Hielson, Hyrum, Utah. The three fliers left Karachi Sept.1 after being rescued from a Japanese prison. Thousands of visitors streamed to the national Air Force museum on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013 to pay a Veterans Day weekend tribute to the few surviving members of the Doolittle Raiders, airmen whose daring raid on Japan helped boost American morale during World War II, as they planned to make their ceremonial final toast together. Only four of the 80 Raiders are still living, and one was unable to attend because of health issues. (AP Photo)

(AP) — Known as the Doolittle Raiders, the 80 men who risked their lives on a World War II bombing mission on Japan after the attack on Pearl Harbor were toasted one last time by their surviving comrades and honored with a Veterans Day weekend of fanfare shared by thousands.

Three of the four surviving Raiders attended the toast Saturday at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Their late commander, Lt. Gen. James “Jimmy” Doolittle, started the tradition but they decided this autumn’s ceremony would be their last.

“May they rest in peace,” Lt. Col. Richard Cole, 98, said before he and fellow Raiders — Lt. Col. Edward Saylor, 93, and Staff Sgt. David Thatcher, 92 — sipped cognac from specially engraved silver goblets. The 1896 cognac was saved for the occasion after being passed down from Doolittle.

Hundreds invited to the ceremony, including family members of deceased Raiders, watched as the three each called out “here” as a historian read the names of all 80 of the original airmen.

The fourth surviving Raider, Lt. Col. Robert Hite, 93, couldn’t travel to Ohio because of health problems.

But son Wallace Hite said his father, wearing a Raiders blazer and other traditional garb for their reunions, made his own salute to the fallen with a silver goblet of wine at home in Nashville, Tenn., earlier in the week.

Hite is the last survivor of eight Raiders who were captured by Japanese soldiers. Three were executed; another died in captivity.

A B-25 bomber flyover helped cap an afternoon memorial tribute in which a wreath was placed at the Doolittle Raider monument outside the museum. Museum officials estimated some 10,000 people turned out for Veterans Day weekend events honoring the 1942 mission credited with rallying American morale and throwing the Japanese off balance.

Acting Air Force Secretary Eric Fanning said America was at a low point, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and other Axis successes, before “these 80 men who showed the nation that we were nowhere near defeat.” He noted that all volunteered for a mission with high risks throughout, from the launch of B-25 bombers from a carrier at sea, the attack on Tokyo, and lack of fuel to reach safe bases.

The Raiders have said they didn’t realize at the time that their mission would be considered an important event in turning the war’s tide. It inflicted little major damage physically, but changed Japanese strategy while firing up Americans.

“It was what you do … over time, we’ve been told what effect our raid had on the war and the morale of the people,” Saylor said in an interview.

The Brussett, Mont., native who now lives in Puyallup, Wash., said he was one of the lucky ones.

“There were a whole bunch of guys in World War II; a lot of people didn’t come back,” he said.

Thatcher, of Missoula, Mont., said the raid just seemed like “one of many bombing missions” during the war. The most harrowing part for him was the crash landing of his plane, depicted in the movie “Thirty Seconds over Tokyo.”

Cole, of Comfort, Texas, was Doolittle’s co-pilot that day. Three crew members died as Raiders bailed out or crash-landed their planes in China, but most were helped to safety by Chinese villagers and soldiers.

Cole, Saylor and Thatcher were greeted Saturday by flag-waving well-wishers ranging from small children to fellow war veterans. Twelve-year-old Joseph John Castellano’s grandparents brought him from their Dayton home.

“This was Tokyo. The odds of their survival were one in a million,” the boy said. “I just felt like I owe them a few short hours of the thousands of hours I will be on Earth.”

Organizers said more than 600 people, including descendants of Chinese villagers who helped the Raiders and Pearl Harbor survivors, were invited to the final-toast ceremony.

The 80 silver goblets in the ceremony were presented to the Raiders in 1959 by the city of Tucson, Ariz. The Raiders’ names are engraved twice, the second upside-down. During the ceremony, white-gloved cadets presented each of the three with their personal goblets and their longtime manager poured the cognac. The deceased’s glasses are turned upside-down.

___

Contact the reporter at http://www.twitter.com/dansewell

Associated PressNews Topics: General news, War and unrest, Veterans, Plane crashes, Air force, Aviation accidents and incidents, Transportation accidents, Accidents, Accidents and disasters, Transportation, Armed forces, Military and defense, Government and politics



Source: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-11-10-US-Doolittle-Raiders-Final-Toast/id-145408f57f254fd3b3f8eafe341deae3
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Senators grapple with health care rollout woes

(AP) —

A senior administration official involved in implementation of President Barack Obama’s health care plan says the program’s sign-up website has improved since its launch more than a month ago and is still improving.

Marilyn Tavenner told a Senate committee that the site is now able to process nearly 17,000 registrants per hours with almost no errors.

In her opening remarks at a congressional hearing Tuesday, Tavenner did not say how many individuals have enrolled for health care through the site. The administration has steadfastly refused to divulge those numbers, and says they will be made available at mid-month.

Tavenner is head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/89ae8247abe8493fae24405546e9a1aa/Article_2013-11-05-Health%20Overhaul-Problems/id-c6b89ed05b9f44178b1003d5f30572a2
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An awesome guy made an insane Thor hammer that smashes everything

An awesome guy made an insane Thor hammer that smashes everything

This ridiculously awesome man made version of Thor’s hammer Mjölnir is so impressive that even our most Thor-like human Chris Hemsworth would have trouble swinging it around. Though it’s not quite the weight of 300 billion elephants, it’s the closest thing to Mjölnir on Earth. That’s because it’s made from 10 separate pieces of steel alloyed with chromium and molybdenum. At its heaviest, it can weigh over 200 pounds.

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